Tag Archives: advantage

Natural Disasters Can Destroy, But Your Data Is Safe If It’s In The Cloud

02 Nov 17
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This past hurricane season has brought some of the most harrowing, widespread destruction the southeastern United States has ever been forced to weather. But, despite the enormous, tragic cost of these natural disasters, the people of these communities persevere. In the wake of widespread wind damage and flooding, communities have banded together. Thousands of volunteers and neighbors are working as one to rebuild and find the way forward. There is no doubt, however, that the havoc wreaked by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma will produce aftershocks that will echo through affected areas for decades.

To anyone who turtled up in their attic in the middle of the storm or just saw a picture of the wreckage in the news after the hurricanes departed, the physical damage caused by the storm is obvious. What’s less obvious is the effect these storms have on the futures of the survivors, the reverberating impact that cuts thousands of life plans short and forces individuals to completely change their course in a cruel reversal of fate.

“Forty percent of small businesses don’t survive these events,” said Russel Honore, the previous Joint Task Force commander for Hurricane Katrina. The electrical grid is knocked out for days, and businesses are forced to close the office for what they hope is a temporary period due to flooding.

Each day that a business can’t provide service, it’s bleeding money — a cost that many businesses, especially the little guys, can’t absorb. So, they close for good, their buildings go up for lease and those who were once the heads of promising young businesses are now unemployed, in the market for a job in a city up to its neck in water.

Just as common is a business that finds its central data structures wiped out by physical damage. Following a hurricane, most businesses near the storm should have little trouble cleaning up and remodeling following nasty flooding, but if their servers, computers and network infrastructure have been wiped out, it’s a completely different story.

Oftentimes, a catastrophic loss of data will shutter a business for good. A 2010 report by technology research firm Gartner Group stated that 43 percent of businesses went belly-up almost immediately after a “major loss” of data, while 51% shut down within just two years. That leaves a measly 6% survival rate for businesses that suffer company-wide data loss.

These are scary numbers, to be sure, but there is good news: Businesses that migrate their data to the cloud are at significantly less risk of losing vital data. This is not only because your typical cloud service will back up your up-to-date data with several levels of redundancy, but because most cloud services are actually more secure than their on-site counterparts in general.

And make no mistake, businesses with on-site data are susceptible to loss far beyond physical disasters like hurricanes, flooding, earthquakes or solar flares. Don’t forget the risks disgruntled employees, freak accidents and, especially, hackers pose to your precious data. While it’s true that all of these risks still exist with cloud-based services, they’re much reduced. A 2012 Alert Logic report stated that “on-premises environment users actually suffer more [hacking] incidents” than cloud-based users, while also being subjected to “significantly more brute force attacks.” When you think about it, this makes sense. With your entire system backed up on a number of off-site locations, it’s much more difficult for hackers to encrypt the entirety of your data and hold it for ransom.

That said, not every business absolutely needs the cloud to stay secure. Certain business models need on-site structures for various reasons, and a few find it more cost-effective. Still, the cloud is definitely something that any savvy business owner needs to examine closely as a potential option. It could mean the difference between flourishing in the next fiscal quarter and going under.

What is VoIP Technology?

01 Sep 17
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Is it time for your business to abandon that ancient land line phone and discover the flexibility and convenience of VoIP technology? If so, you’re in luck because we’re working on a series of blog posts on this topic.  Let’s jump right in and learn the basics…

When you install VoIP technology into your home or business, you’ll have the ability to talk to others using Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP.)  All that means is that you’ll be able to use the phone that’s connected to the internet to make calls.

Instead of phone lines that traditionally run over the electrical or phone lines in your home already, VoIP uses your internet connection instead.

In most cases, you won’t be able to tell the difference in using VoIP over other phone technology.  It gives you the same basic results.  It sounds easy, right?  It really is that simple.

To do this, several key things will be necessary.

  1. You will need to connect your standard telephone to an adapter unit that is VoIP qualified or get a new internet ready phone unit. You may also use a microphone equipped computer to make your calls instead of a phone.
  2. When you pick up the phone to dial your friend across the ocean, the VoIP adapter realizes what you are doing and turns the voice signals you are sending into your phone into digital based signals. These are then sent across the ocean through the Internet, instead of traveling through any phone line.
  3. Your friend receives your call in the same way. He or she will pick up the phone when you call and then VoIP goes to work again.  This time it translates the digital like signals back into a standard voice transmission.  When your friend uses their phone, they hear your voice, nothing more.

As you can see, it really doesn’t make much of a difference in the experience that you have using the telephone.  You’ll be doing the same thing that you are already doing.

Here’s how it works:

Phone Call –To- Adapter- Internet – Adapter –To- Phone

Although it may seem like this process takes time, it really does not.  It will take little to no time to convert your voice into a digital signal to go over the internet service that you have and back into your voice so your friend will hear you.  In fact, the process happens so fast you may not even realize what is happening at all!

Computer Communication

Another option that you may have comes in the form of using the computer in your home or business to make your calls.

In order to do this, you will need to have a computer that has a microphone built in.  This microphone will serve as your communication tool.

When you make a call, you will simply use the software that is installed on your computer to call your friend.  When they answer, you can talk to them without any type of handset.  Instead, you’ll use the microphone to talk into.

The process is still the same.  The computer will take your voice and translate it into a digital signal which is then sent over the internet to your friend’s computer.  They can either use the phone or their own computer to talk to you.  The voice once again changes from a digital signal into an actual voice and you hear your friend, just as you would if you had dialed their phone number into your phone.

You can also do this by using a computer that is equipped with a headset that allows you to speak into it for more privacy.

As you can see, VoIP technology is quite easy to use and can help your business stay connected to your clients, suppliers and associates around the world. Techno Advantage can help you get the right equipment, ensure that your connection is optimized and maybe even save money!

If you are considering VoIP technology for your business, contact our Techno Pros here at Techno Advantage. 

Why Your Current Antivirus, Backup, And Firewall Have Been Rendered Completely USELESS (And What You Need To Do About It)

16 Aug 17
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At the end of World War I, German engineer Arthur Scherbius constructed a device that would become central in another worldwide conflict of unimaginable magnitude over 20 years later: the Enigma machine. The machines, which steadily became more complex with each iteration, consisted of a series of rotors that, by themselves, encrypted messages input via the attached typewriter. Each rotor performed a simple substitution cipher, but when run through multiple rotors, the encryption reached a staggering level of complexity.

Initially used for transmitting sensitive company secrets in the commercial sector, the technology was eagerly adopted by the German military machine prior to World War II. After war broke out across Europe once again, Enigma encoding became central to the operation of the Axis powers, used for sending vital, sensitive intelligence across the airwaves. Due to the complexity of the Enigma system, the Germans were certain that the code would not, and could not, be broken.

But the Germans were wrong. Using photographs of stolen Enigma operating manuals obtained by a German spy, the Polish General Staff’s Cipher Bureau managed to construct an Enigma machine of their own, enabling them to covertly decrypt substantial amounts of Axis intercepts. Ahead of the impending invasion of Poland, the Poles shared their knowledge with the French and British military to expedite the defeat of the Germans. A massive team at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, led by code-breaking master Alan Turing, became the central location for Allied efforts to keep up with Enigma operations.

Germany, still convinced the code was fundamentally unbreakable, continued using Enigma for a wide array of communications. But even the most complicated four-rotor Enigma systems were eventually decrypted. Great pains were taken to ensure the Germans never learned their precious code had been broken, labeling any intelligence gained from Enigma as “Ultra,” keeping the significance of Bletchley Park’s operations under wraps. Ultra-intelligence was used sparingly to avoid German suspicion.

The efforts of the Polish Cipher Bureau, Alan Turing, Bletchley Park, and the hundreds of men and women who contributed to the cracking of the Enigma code were described as “decisive” in theshortening of the war, and, at the high end, are estimated to have saved over 14 million lives.

Much like the Germans who assumed Enigma was uncrackable, most business owners believe their current, potentially outdated, cyber security measures will keep their data safe. But, in the contemporary age where digital information is as precious as gold, cybercriminals are working around the clock to penetrate even the most robust security solutions. You can bet they’ve already created a workaround for your current antivirus. What was good enough before may not be good enough today. After all, it’s simply impossible that a security solution from even two years back could be equipped to defend your precious data from a cutting-edge hacking technology that didn’t even exist when it was created.

Today, companies that fail to stay abreast of the latest cyber security trends — clinging foolishly to their own Enigma — are certain to pay the price down the line. Once the lock is picked, you need a new lock, and criminals are cracking new locks each and every day.

Luckily, as your IT provider, we’re cyber security experts, and we constantly seek the latest and most robust security solutions. Don’t leave your company’s security up to a false sense of confidence. Always be looking at options to upgrade your digital security and make it a sure thing.

The Hidden Dangers Of “Shadow IT” To Your Business

14 Jun 17
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We all know that using information technology — programs, apps, or internet browsing — carries a certain amount of risk. Nobody wants to have their secure data compromised, but technology brings enough benefits that the risk is worth it. So you vet certain systems, you establish protocols, you update and patch your software, and you keep track of the technology used at work.

But what about the technology your employees are using that isn’t part of your official plan? We’re talking about messaging apps, Excel macros, cloud data storage, collaboration spaces, and even hardware like USB drives, smartphone storage, and personal laptops that you don’t control.

We call this “shadow IT,” and that’s a whole lot of potential holes to cover!

Even if you ignore the dangers of having accounts hacked, data stolen, and websites vandalized, shadow IT can be very inefficient. You don’t control it, so you don’t know where important information is or what work is being done. It makes it hard to avoid duplication of efforts and even harder to manage employee productivity. What are you to do?

Well, your gut reflex might be to “crack down” on using unauthorized technology for work purposes. Swallow that reaction, though — you can’t stop it, and you’ll just harm morale. You’ll also drive usage even further underground; your people won’t be honest with you for fear of reprisal. That means that if a compromise occurs, you’ll be the last to know.

Instead, keep an eye on the situation. Make it clear that you support employees using the tools they need to get the job done, as long as they let you know what those tools are. If your people start using cloud storage apps, that’s fine — but have them explain how they’ll keep that data secure. Just as you empower them to find their own tools, empower them to keep things secure.

You probably can’t come up with a list of all the shadow IT that’s being used at your work, but you can keep an eye on the trends as they develop. Research the technology that’s being used and watch the headlines for data breaches or other compromises.

In some cases, you will have to crack down on specific apps, programs, or devices being used at your work; they’re just too risky. If you’ve worked with employees and fostered good communication, this shouldn’t be an issue. Remember to avoid blaming employees when shadow IT becomes a problem — especially if they bring the issue to your attention themselves. There’s nothing wrong with asking your people to stop using a specific program or device, as long as you’re transparent and have good reasons.

Last, but not least, try to look on the bright side. Shadow IT may be a little risky, but it also presents opportunities for employees to drive productivity and try out new best practices. If they’re using a piece of technology, it’s probably doing something that the currently “approved” tech is not. They’re also showing self-starter tendencies and trying to do their job better. And that’s always something you should support!

The Latest Malware Threat Will Make You Wanna Cry

24 May 17
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Wannacry, Wannacrypt, Wannadecrypter, these are just some of the names of the latest string of malware circulating both the news cycles, and the internet.  They are all part of a Major Ransomware sting that hit the scene last weekend.  In case you don’t know Ransomware is a bug that infects your computer and then encrypts whole drives with an encryption key, making them useless unless you have the key to un-encrypt them.  The bad guys then offer to “Sell” you the key for $300 Bitcoin.  (Bitcoin is an internet currency that is untraceable, and gaining popularity as a global currency, and not just by the bad guys).  Wannacry exploited a vulnerability in Windows to encrypt the computers.  Microsoft had released the Patches back in March, and we had them set up to go out then.  We checked through our software and found that all of our clients that are on the Advantage Care Monitoring packages were already patched (there were a couple of un monitored computers that didn’t have the patch, but we took care of that).  We just wanted to let you know that we are taking these security threats serious, and are doing what we can to help protect you.

Things to watch out for:

  1. Strange attachments that you are not expecting in an email. If you get an email with an attachment that you are not expecting.  Before you open it, reach out and see if the individual actually sent something to you.  It was said that the Wannacry was being distributed via email (worm where bug would replicate itself and email it out to everyone in your contacts list).
  2. If you get that pesky window that pops up saying that it wants to run windows updates… let it.
  3. If you are on a maintenance plan with us, but you shut your computer down every night, we can’t push out the updates to you, and end up trying to push them out during the day, disrupting your work flow. This can be avoided by leaving your computers turned on at night, when we do the updates, and other housekeeping duties to ensure that your computers are up to date, and fresh for you the following day.
  4. Be mindful of where you are going on the internet. The internet is full of corrupted web sites, some are just malicious, and others are corrupt and could infect you just by visiting them.
  5. Nothing on the internet is “Free”. Free games, and Free coupons come with a catch.  They get to install stuff on your computer that sends them info, and leave you vulnerable.  Once these things get on your system, they reach out to their “Paying” friends and invite them to the party on your computer, and now all of a sudden your computer is crawling because all of this unwanted software is clogging everything up, and potentially doing harmful things in the background.
  6. Backup, Backup, Backup!!!!!! The best defense against Ransomware is just blow away the infected computer/files and rebuild it. A backup is essential for this.  An offsite, disconnected version is essential these days as well.  There have been cases where an external hard drive with all of the companies backup files were encrypted also (because they were connected to the computer when it was infected). So just having a backup file may not be enough.

We are taking extra steps to ensure all of our client’s security.  If you have any questions, feel free to contact us and we can  discuss this more.

4 E-mails You Should NEVER Open

17 May 17
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No matter how “bomb-proof” we make your network, you and your employees can still invite a hacker in if you click on a link or open an attachment in an e-mail sent by a cybercriminal. Some spam is obvious (can you say, “Viagra at a discount”?) but others are VERY cleverly designed to sneak past all the filters and trick the recipient into opening the door. Known as a “phishing” e-mail, this still is the #1 way hackers circumvent firewalls, filters and antivirus, so it’s critical that you and your employees know how to spot a threatening e-mail. Here are four types of e-mail ploys you should be on high alert for.

The Authority E-mail. The most common phishing e-mails are ones impersonating your bank, the IRS or some authority figure. The rule of thumb is this: ANY e-mail that comes in where 1) you don’t PERSONALLY know the sender, including e-mails from the IRS, Microsoft or your “bank,” and 2) asks you to “verify” your account should be deleted. Remember, ANY important notification will be sent via old-fashioned snail mail. If it’s important, they can call you.

The “Account Verification” E-mail. Any e-mail that asks you to verify your password, bank information or login credentials, OR to update your account information, should be ignored. No legitimate vendor sends e-mails asking for this; they will simply ask you upon logging in to update or verify your information if that’s necessary.

The Typo E-mail. Another big warning sign is typos. E-mails coming from overseas (which is where most of these attacks come from) are written by people who do not speak or write English well. Therefore, if there are obvious typos or grammar mistakes, delete it.

The Zip File, PDF Or Invoice Attachment. Unless you specifically KNOW the sender of an e-mail, never, ever open an attachment. That includes PDFs, zip files, music and video files and anything referencing an unpaid invoice or accounting file (many hackers use this to get people in accounting departments to open e-mails). Of course, ANY file can carry a virus, so better to delete it than be sorry.

Cybercriminals Confess: The Top 3 Tricks, Sneaky Schemes And Gimmicks They Use To Hack Your Computer Network

21 Apr 17
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  1. We’re masters at getting you to click on fake e-mails. One of the most common ways hackers gain access to computer networks and devices is via phishing e-mails. Gone are the days when you could easily spot a spammer’s e-mail because of its poor English, typos and punctuation mistakes – attacks are getting more and more sophisticated. That’s because cybercriminals have access to the same cutting-edge online marketing tools that legitimate companies have, giving them the ability to send highly targeted messages that look completely legitimate from sources you trust. These e-mails often use your name, your professional title and may even reference a group you belong to. Further, if you click on the e-mails or respond, you’re inviting a hacker into your network that bypasses a firewall and antivirus software. The only way to avoid getting snared by a phishing e-mail is to NEVER click on, open or respond to any e-mail requesting personal information, passwords, login details, etc. Always go directly to the site.
  2. We automate attacks that work around the clock. Hackers have software programs that systematically test millions of possible passwords to break into your PC. Easy-to-guess passwords are worthless against the power, automation and sophistication of these super-apps that will constantly hammer away at guessing your password. Because of this, make sure your passwords contain both uppercase and lowercase letters, at least one number and special characters – and NEVER use easy-to-guess passwords like “letmein” or “password.”
  3. We can use legitimate web sites to attack you. A growing number of cyberattacks are coming via “drive-by” download, where a hacker gains access to a legitimate, honest business web site (or sets up a site that looks legit on every level) but has malicious code installed called an “exploit kit.” An exploit kit can discover a vulnerability fast by probing your operating system, browser and the software you have installed (like a PDF reader or video player) to find a way to access your PC or network. If you (or your IT company!) aren’t applying regular security updates, you are unprotected against these exploits.

While these are common ways hackers gain access, there are dozens of other more straightforward ways hackers gain access if you’re not diligently updating and patching your network, maintaining an up-to-date firewall, antivirus and spam-filtering unified threat-management system. The days of “That could never happen to me” are gone.

If you want peace of mind that YOUR business isn’t a “sitting duck” to hackers, call us for a free assessment at 317-857-0150. You’ll discover if you truly are protected from common hacker attacks and what you can do now to avoid being an easy target. Call today at 317-857-0150.

4 Must-Have, Low-Risk Cloud Solutions

05 Apr 17
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Let’s face it, your business has more competition than ever. And they’ll eat you alive if you fall behind in today’s technology “arms race.”

Maybe your network needs greater security. Or you haven’t yet taken advantage of new cloud-based apps that help your team get more done in less time. Today, the action is in the cloud. And if you don’t know what’s out there, it’s just that much easier for competitors to pull ahead.

To help you stay on top, here’s a quick survey of four ways to put the cloud in your corner, along with examples of each.

Network Security

As devices on your network become more diverse and mobile, monitoring them in real time is absolutely critical to averting cyber-attacks. A good network-security tool probes for weak points and alerts you to potential threats. It can employ both hardware and software technologies. And today’s environment demands a bevy of checkpoints, from access control to WiFi-intrusion monitoring.

But how do you protect against threats that evade your monitoring efforts? Due to the recent spread of “fileless” malware, no antivirus program is 100% “bullet-proof.” However, you should be able to find basic software protection for around $40 per user. Look for features such as e-mail security, data loss prevention, network segmentation and behavioral analytics. And ideally, it scans quickly, takes up little space on your devices and may even be able to recover files encrypted by ransomware.

Collaboration

Giving your team the right cloud collaboration tools can be almost as good as giving them steroids… (Except, of course, it’s legal.) With the wide array of apps available today, the trick is finding the best one – or the best combination – for your company. Top contenders include Asana, Slack, Teamwork, Trello and Google Drive. These and similar apps can improve efficiencies in areas like project and task management, team communications and collaboration, brainstorming, document processing and storage, and more. And with cloud collaboration, you’re no longer restricted to bringing aboard talent from your local area alone.

Contracts & Accounting

Contracts and proposals that get bogged down in logistics can hurt monthly revenues. Is your sales team still asking customers to sign and fax back important documents? If so, they’re losing precious minutes every day. Then there’s the cost of storing and managing physical files. It all adds up. It’s no wonder so many companies now use electronic signature apps, such as DocuSign, Adobe Sign and RPost. They’ll let you manage the signing of important documents entirely online, and will encrypt and store files for you. Some are even court-approved and create a full audit trail.

For small business accounting, industry veteran QuickBooks, now with an online version, and upstart Xero can help you keep the books with relative ease. They both offer a clean, intuitive UI and affordable pricing with a comprehensive set of features. And, of course, being cloud-based, they can be accessed from a variety of locations, adding flexibility to your workforce.

If you’d like to know how well your company is (or isn’t) taking advantage of today’s cloud, contact us.

Network Abuse: Don’t Push Your ‘Luck’

16 Mar 17
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Look around your office. Isn’t it great to see your team hard at work on their computers? Yet if we take a closer look, let’s see what’s really happening…

Joe, your new sales rep, is poring over last weekend’s game stats…

Amy in marketing is looking for a new job, surfing your competitors’ websites, chatting with their HR people…

Wes, over in customer support, just bogged down your entire network by downloading a video file of Metallica in concert…

Guy, your new hire in shipping, is on hotdate.com, viewing questionable photos…

Bob in accounting is browsing stock-investing sites, in search of a hot tip…

Okay, so maybe it’s not that bad at your company. But this type of behavior will happen to some degree if you don’t proactively prevent it. The real problem is, unfiltered content often links to malware and other threats. Ignore it and you risk productivity losses, legal liabilities, extortion, blackmail and fraud. And not only that, the resulting data loss and corruption can cost your company big-time. Cyberthreats stemming from unfiltered content aren’t something you can count on your lucky leprechaun or four-leaf clover to protect you from.

In today’s mobile environment, content filtering has becoming a greater challenge than ever before. Your company may already be doing some filtering at the network level. However, when was the last time you checked the number of mobile devices linked to your network? As your workforce goes mobile, your network is exposed to a rapidly expanding “attack surface.” With BYOD (bring your own device) now the norm, the old rules of content filtering just don’t cut it anymore.

Are You Making Any Of These Mistakes?

Old content-filtering models presume your network has a safe “firewall.” But now, with BYOD, you need a different way to protect your data. And that’s where endpoint security comes into play. Endpoint filtering keeps devices on your network safe from infection, no matter where they hook into the Internet.

But make ANY of the following mistakes with endpoint security and your network could be a sitting duck:

  1. Missing even ONE endpoint. This applies to tablets and smartphones as well as home-based machines that VPN into your network.
  1. Skimping on security policies, protocols and training. Believing that tech tools alone will keep your network secure is a recipe for breaches. In fact, no technology can keep a network safe if users cut corners.
  1. Leaving endpoint filtering out of your overall security plan. Ad hoc security invites disaster. An improperly designed system exposes holes that hackers love to find.

So, What Exactly Should You Filter?

Forrester Research states that companies whose users access the cloud should:

  • Detect and intercept unusual or fraudulent activities related to data in the cloud.
  • Detect, neutralize and eliminate malware in cloud platforms.
  • Detect and monitor unsanctioned cloud applications and platforms usage.
  • Protect against leaks of confidential information.
  • Encrypt structured and unstructured data in cloud platforms.
  • Investigate suspicious users and incidents.

Between BYOD and ever more complex cyber threats, you simply can’t afford to run around putting out fires. You absolutely MUST proactively defend your network in depth with endpoint content filtering.

Lost Employee Smartphone? Do This NOW!

15 Feb 17
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“Hey boss, I lost my smartphone.”

How well have you prepared for this moment? It will happen sooner or later. If your company has a plan in place, no big deal. If not, you may suddenly get that sinking feeling in your gut …

And well you might. You now have three big worries:

Compliance Issues – If your employee had access to information covered by any number of regulations, your company could be subject to stiff penalties. One employer we know of wound up with a $900,000 fine.

Data Security – Sensitive company data in the wrong hands could spell disaster. Access to your network, secure sites, proprietary files, work-related e-mails and corporate secrets may now be out of your control. You must move quickly to prevent serious financial harm.

Employee Privacy and Property Concerns – If a valued employee had family photos and movies on the device, and you remotely delete all data on the phone, you may now have a disgruntled, or even uncooperative, employee. Especially if company policy regarding BYOD (bring your own device) and data loss were not clearly stated and agreed to up-front.

So how do you prevent a relatively minor incident from blowing up into a big problem? Here are seven smart measures you can take right now to prepare for the day an employee smartphone is lost or stolen:

  1. Install a mobile device management (MDM) system on any employee device to be used at work. This software can create a virtual wall separating work data from personal. It facilitates any security measures you wish to impose. And to protect employee privacy, it can limit company access to work data only.
  1. Determine which devices will be allowed and which types of company data people may access from them.
  1. Require that employees agree with an Acceptable Use Policy before they connect to your network. Make sure these include notice as to conditions in which company data may be “wiped” – i.e., destroyed. Also include specific policies regarding device inspection and removal of company records.
  1. Put strong data protection practices in place. Require use of hard-to-crack passwords and auto-locking after periods of inactivity. Establish protocols for reporting lost or stolen devices. Mandate antivirus and other protective software as well as regular backups.
  1. Designate someone at your company to authorize access to software and critical data. This person can also be your main point of contact for questions about BYOD policy and practices. It might also work well to distribute a resource page or FAQ document to your employees.
  1. Establish a standard protocol for what to do when a device is lost or stolen. Both Android and iOS phones have features that allow device owners to locate, lock and/or “wipe” all data on their phones. Make sure your policy requires that these features are set up in advance. Then, when a device is lost or stolen, your employee can be instructed to take appropriate action according to your protocol in order to protect company data.
  1. And finally, your best protection is to implement a well-crafted BYOD policy in advance. Develop it in partnership with risk management and operations personnel, as well as legal counsel and IT professionals, to come up with an effective and comprehensive plan.

Do not delay on this – it is a serious vulnerability that can and must be addressed in order to assure the safety of your company’s data and systems.