Tag Archives: passwords

5 Common Workarounds For Remembering Passwords, And Why You Should Stop Doing Them Immediately

08 Dec 16
lverbik
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With everything we do online, it’s impossible to remember all the passwords you need for a web site. So what do most people do? They use one of the following five “workarounds” that make them an easy target for cybercriminals and hackers. Here’s what they are:

  • Using the same password for everything. If hackers gain access to one account, they know you are likely to use the same password for other sites and will use that to try and access everything. Plus, they can easily look at your browsing history to see what sites you’ve been accessing recently.
  • Using easy-to-guess passwords. Without a doubt, obvious passwords such as “123456,” “password” or “qwerty” leave the door wide-open for hackers. Their ever-more-robust programs can sniff out these easy-to-crack passwords in a heartbeat.
  • Allowing your web browser to remember them for you (autofill feature). For highly sensitive web sites, like your bank account, this is a big mistake. Plus, this still doesn’t solve your password problem entirely if you use more than one browser or have multiple devices.
  • Putting them all on a file you save on your hard drive. If a hacker gains access to your computer and discovers that file, you’re toast!
  • Writing them down on a Post-it note on your computer. You wouldn’t lock your house and then tape a key to the doorframe, so how can you possibly think this is safe?

Here’s A Quick and Easy Way To Bullet-Proof Your Passwords

The best solution we’ve found is to use a password manager such as 1Password, KeePass, LastPass or RoboForm.

These popular programs create hacker-proof passwords for you, complex enough to foil intruders, yet stored safely so you don’t have to memorize them. They work with most platforms and use encryption powerful enough that you don’t need to worry about keeping all your passwords in one place.

Choosing and enforcing strong passwords is a chore; but when you consider the costs, loss, downtime and even bad PR that can come with a hacker attack, you cannot take the “easy” road on this.

Why and How to Get Password-Smart NOW!

18 Aug 15
lverbik
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It seems the more we advance technologically and the more we rely on the security of our online accounts, the harder it gets to keep them secure. As fast as new protection is created, hackers find ways to crack the code. How to keep your passwords secure as your front line of defense? We need to be smart about it. Here are some ways:

  1. Change your flippin’ passwords! An online survey reported in a Dell Power More article found half of all passwords were more than 5 years old! A whopping 77% had not changed their password in at least one year. And even scarier, 21% use passwords they created more than 10 years ago! Come on, people.
  2. Don’t use duplicate passwords on multiple accounts. The same article states that 73% of you are doing this. You must realize that when a hacker cracks your password code, they then have access to ALL of the accounts you are “protecting” with that password.
  3. Use password management tools, like Last Pass, or those built into browsers like Chrome. Though this is not 100% safe from a hack attack (as we experienced a couple of months ago), it is still one of the best ways to add a strong layer of protection to your accounts and allow you to need only remember one master password.
  4. Be random. The more random the password, the more secure. People often create easy to use and remember passwords like Il0vemyd0g! but thieves know these patterns and can quickly generate these passwords to gain entry to your accounts. Using nonsensical passwords is a strong protection. Some password management tools like last pass will even generate them for you.
  5. Use two-step verification (aka two-factor authentication). They may be able to get past a password, but if you have two-step verification required, this means you must also provide a second bit of personal data to access your account. It might be an email or text sent to you with a code. This type of tool is good especially for sensitive accounts like banking and credit cards.
  6. Use password recovery. You’re going to need a lot of passwords if you’re the average user with 24 online accounts. And many companies will make you change your password frequently. You’re going to forget–let’s just agree to that. So use password recovery options to retrieve them. Some let you validate an account through a code sent to you via text message or a phone number you call to give personal information only you would know. Always think in terms of backup when it comes to securing your accounts.

We’ve got to be smart to outsmart our foes. It takes a little extra effort, but well worth the peace of mind knowing your precious personal data is safe. We hope these tips will give you new ways to combat the enemy.

What other tools or ideas do you have to protect your online accounts? We’d like to share those here. If you need help setting up a secure online defense, talk to us at TechnoAdvantage. We’re in the business of helping you do business smarter.